Linchpin Thoughts and a Colleague’s Tips on Climbing the Career Ladder

I now have another book to offer young people out of college and just stepping into their first jobs of their career: Linchpin, by Seth Godin.  If you recall in one of my post from the #BizWomen Orlando Business Journal Women Mentorship Program, Shirley Decker, with I.D.E.A.S. recommended I read this book.

Because I’ve now been in working my career for more than 10 years now (AACK, OMG, IT’S BEEN THAT LONG?!? I JUST BLEW MY OWN MIND HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO ME), the book was more of a pat on the back for the fact that I followed the book to a T before it was written.  And so that’s why I want to recommend it to new people.  I think it will really help the Millenials coming into the workforce understand that, while “paying your dues” is something they don’t have to tolerate (because they are demanding a more work-life balance than those of us that came right before them), they do need to make themselves indispensable if  they don’t want to work their butts off.  The book outlines many ways people have made their mark and gives tips on how one can showcase their creativity, problem-solving skills, and expertise in their field.  There were great life lessons that if one can learn them vicariously from the author of this book, they’ll be able to to make easier leaps to better positions – or they’ll be helping create their own positions in life (kind of like I did… I love my job, by the way.)

A colleague whom I wish I could call mentor but frankly I’ve never gotten to spend enough time with him (although I did try back in 2009 or so) has written an article on his agency’s blog on this same topic as well as created a video discussing the same content.  That swell person is Terry Mooney, the COO of Evok, one of the larger ad agencies in the Orlando Area.  They have a newsletter they post, which you can sign up for here, and his video, posted below with his permission, is another great asset that young people should watch and absorb.

 


Ads on the Road to Rishikesh

From Delhi we traveled four hours to Rishikesh, and along the way, we saw interesting transportation and interesting ads.  :)

On some of the roads, we'd have to pull over for the driver to go to a building and pay for the toll.

On some of the roads, we’d have to pull over for the driver to go to a building and pay for the toll.  The first time we though he’d abandoned us, but luckily our lovely guide was their to explain the procedure.

Here are some pictures of the kinds of transportation we came across while driving the highways and inside of the small towns:

A colorful bus and a horse drawn trailer full of sticks.  There was no way to pass them for awhile.  And people tried.

A colorful bus and a horse drawn trailer full of sticks (and there were a lot of each that morning). There was no way to pass them for awhile. And people tried.

Motorized bicycles and scooters dashed in ad out of traffic.

Motorized bicycles, regular bicycles and scooters dashed in and out of traffic.

People road in the back of trucks all of the time.  And almost every over-sized vehicle asked everyone to honk their horns before, during, and after they were passed.

People rode in the back of trucks all of the time. And almost every over-sized vehicle asked everyone to honk their horns before, during, and after they were passed.  It was a very honky country.  At first it would annoy me because of how we in the US have been trained to handle honks: one must be doing something wrong, right?  Well, in India, honking was the way for everyone to know where everyone was as mirrors were irregular, cars were different sizes, and no one actually drove in the lanes painted on the roads.

This is a tractor.  It was on the major highway leading out of Dehli.  It was kind of slow.

This is a tractor. It was on the major highway leading out of Dehli. It was slow.

Horses were still a major source of transportation among the small towns.

Horses were still a major source of transportation among the small towns.

As we were taking pictures of all of the billboards we started to wonder how people could get their ads on them.  We finally found out mid-way of the trek.

Advertise here

Most women in India never showed their shoulders.  But I guess it was okay for advertising?

Most women in India never showed their shoulders. But I guess it was okay for advertising?

Speaking of not covering up, this public school had a naked guru on it.  They're allowed to be naked though.

Speaking of not covering up, this public school had a naked guru on it. They’re allowed to be naked though.

This public school had a giraffe.  I'm not sure why.

This public school had a giraffe. I’m not sure why.

More naked-ish guys.  They work out.

More naked-ish guys. They work out.

There were so many great ads about the problems with drinking and driving on the highways.  This was one of the better shots we could get.  The image is thinly drawn, which is never a best practice when designing a billboard.

There were so many great ads about the problems with drinking and driving on the highways. This was one of the better shots we could get. The image is thinly drawn, which is never a best practice when designing a billboard.

Old buildings were covered in advertising, like I've seen in Peru and Puerto Rico.  Hopefully this helped whoever owned the building.

Old buildings were covered in advertising, like I’ve seen in Peru and Puerto Rico. Hopefully this helped whoever owned the building.

There was so much construction happening in Northeast India that B2B advertising was prevalent.

There was so much construction happening in Northeast India that B2B advertising was prevalent.

Naked billboard.

Naked billboard.


Advertising to the LGBT Community

This blog post was inspired by the new Allstate commercial that spread across Facebook like a wildfire.  In case you were buried under a rock (or are my Mom and this is how she learns about these things… Hi Mom):

It’s inclusive, subtle, thoughtful, endearing, insightful, caring, and clear.  It made me start to think about other amazing ads that either include or target the LGBT community so I did a Google search and it took me on a very satisfying path of learning how the marketing community has evolved in incorporating the LGBT community into all of our community.

The Human Rights Campaign (HRC) put out a list of the top LGBT ads in 2013 and posted a Best Practices to LGBT Marketing and Advertising that ad agencies are starting to follow.  Some of the ads showcased just had all kinds of people in them, like the Nordstrom ad below, or explicitly showcased gay couples doing ordinary things.

Adweek posted their own Best Gay Ads of ever and there was a segment of the list dedicated to ads that were considered inclusive.  They introduced the segment very poignantly, so I’m going to quote them: “Finally, we get to the holy grail of advertising for those who’ve sought gay equality: inclusive, respectful (and usually quite boring) ads that treat gay people like anyone else. I suppose it shouldn’t be surprising that these are often the most controversial.”

Bustle.com also had The Best Ads with Gay Couples and at the very bottom it mentioned that Barneys New York had decided to do an all transgender model campaign for Spring of 2014.  Intrigued, I looked it up and there was a very lovely 30 minute movie about the shoot and the individuals and their stories.  It was very moving and you should take the time to watch it.  The first couple of minutes is fairly artsy, but get through that and learn a little more about a side of humanity you may have not thought much about.  I can’t have it play on my site, so just click the square box and go to Vimeo and enjoy.

Brothers, Sisters, Sons & Daughters: The Film from Barneys The Window on Vimeo.

 


Ads of Delhi

At the airport heading to Delhi.  And there was a BIG difference between New Delhi and Delhi.  And we stayed in the heart of Delhi by the Red Fort.  It was incredible, but very very very very very very very very very crowded. And very very very very very very very very very very dirty.

At the airport heading to Delhi. And there was a BIG difference between New Delhi and Delhi. And we stayed in the heart of Delhi by the Red Fort. It was incredible, but very very very very very very very very very crowded. And very very very very very very very very very very dirty.

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Wanna advertise in Delhi? Here's how.

Wanna advertise in Delhi? Here’s how.

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Wallscapes were prevalent!

Wallscapes were prevalent!

The flash was on in this photo and you can see the particulates hovering in the air.

The flash was on in this photo and you can see the particulates hovering in the air.

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Lots of ads for smoothing out your dark, course hair.

Lots of ads for smoothing out your dark, course hair.

Skin lightening was also a HUGE deal.  They all longed to be tall, blonde, and pale.  Basically, me.  I was a celebrity.

Skin lightening was also a HUGE deal. They all longed to be tall, blonde, and pale. Basically, me. I was a celebrity.

There was sooooo much construction going on everywhere.  But some of it looked like it hadn't been touched in years.

There was sooooo much construction going on everywhere. But some of it looked like it hadn’t been touched in years.

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All of the stores were closed for the morning of Holi Day.  I can understand why as we were all covered in paint!

All of the stores were closed for the morning of Holi Day. I can understand why as we were all covered in paint!

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These were all outside of the Sikh temple.  Schools, speakers, camps, all for the Sikhs.

These were all outside of the Sikh temple. Schools, speakers, camps, all for the Sikhs.

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A beautiful light store that used their building as a wallscape.

A beautiful light store that used their building as a wallscape.

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The second 300 movie was EVERYWHERE.

The second 300 movie was EVERYWHERE.  And this McDonald’s was vegetarian.  They had Masala chickpea burgers.

While Delhi was crowded, dirty, and had poor air quality, we did appreciate the history of the location with the amazing story of the Red Fort and the Red Mosque.  It was also refreshing to see so many religions along one road working together to feed the hungry.  No one should be going without a meal there because the Sikh temple, the Jain temple, the Hindu temple, and the Muslim Mosque all handed out free meals to anyone that walked by.

The community also supports a lot of homeless people.  The morning we left for Rishikesh, we saw thousands of people sleeping on the sidewalks, in their work vans, and getting ready for their day in the public sinks.  There are just sooooo many people in Delhi that there aren’t even enough beds for people.  It is a different way of life that I’m happy I learned about, but would never ever ever want to experience in any lifetime (although in the Hindu religion, they say I already have or eventually will).

Troy and Patti in front of the Red Fort


The Art of War and Lean In

As you might have read in another blog post of mine, I was given book reading advice from many prominent women in the community.  When I asked one such woman what book helped her become the leader she was, without hesitation she said, “The Art of War, by Sun Tzu.”  A few of the other older women at the round table nodded their heads in agreement so I took that as a good sign.

I’m an Audible app junkie.  I listen to a book a month and flip flop between fiction and non-fiction.  So when non-fiction came up, that was the first book in my mentor list that I downloaded.  It’s actually a fairly short book.  Sun Tzu was pretty succinct, so I got the extended version that talked a little bit more about how others have viewed and/or interpreted the book.  So I pretty much read it twice.

As I started listening to the book, it started to dawn on me that by understanding the strategy and tactics that one should use when going to war, one could either use those in business, or try to steer clear of those people that do.  Not to knock people that subscribe to these strategies and implement them in business, tennis, volunteer organizations and treat life like it’s a game of chess, but I don’t think it’s for me.  Having to know all of the pieces so that you can strategically move them into positions that benefit you and eliminate others before any confrontations even occur  sounds exhausting to me.  I feel like a person who is in constant battle mode may always know how to be on top of any situation, but sometimes situations shouldn’t be conquered.  I feel like while it is good to know the ins and outs and the weaknesses and strengths of the people you are working with, you should never view anyone as an opponent that needs to be taken down or put at bay.

Which is why I really enjoyed the book, “Lean In.”  The juxtaposition of how women in the twentieth century needed to scrap and claw their way to the top using the Art of War and how now women are needing to understand that collaborative efforts where everyone raises everyone up together produces better work.  Cheryl Sandberg has looked at how because the corporate ladder has really become a jungle gym, old strategies of using people for their worth and discarding them when you move up is no longer relevant.  And the goal is to maintain open, honest, caring relationships with all fellow workers (all of mankind, really) because more things can get done… better things can get done.

So I can appreciate knowing how some people may utilize “The Art of War,” but I generally prescribe to just leaning in and embracing everyone as a valuable relationship.  If I can help as many people along the way, maybe when I need a little help, I’ll have nice, happy people to ask a favor of.

Thanks for reading the ramblings.


Whirlwind Tour of London

How do you get to see London in less than a day?  Hire David, with David’s Day Tours, give him a map and priorities, and let him take it from there.  The whirlwind highlights:

Yes, this is the supposed T.A.R.D.I.S. from Dr. Who.  I haven't started watching the show, but looking at this thing on Google is pretty cool.  http://www.nerdist.com/2013/08/explore-the-tardis-with-google-maps/

Yes, this is the supposed T.A.R.D.I.S. from Dr. Who. I haven’t started watching the show, but looking at this thing on Google is pretty cool.

This was a cool-looking Batman-type car, a cool butcher shop name, and some store in Spanish, all in one picture.

This was a cool-looking Batman-type car, a cool butcher shop name, and some store in Spanish, all in one picture.

G Orwell lived here 1

So this famous author lived really close to Portobello Road.

So this famous author lived really close to Portobello Road.

Trying to drive on Portobello Road.

Trying to drive on Portobello Road.

Having gotten by everyone on Portobello Road.

Having gotten by everyone on Portobello Road.

Only person on the sidewalk of Portobello Road (because everyone else was walking on the street) was this busker (I learned that term on this trip, actually... and have heard it again since).

Only person on the sidewalk of Portobello Road (because everyone else was walking on the street) was this busker (I learned that term on this trip, actually… and have heard it again since).

They use the softer touch of "Give Way" instead of the US's stern, forceful "Yield."

They use the softer touch of “Give Way” instead of the US’s stern, forceful “Yield.”

We did a quick drive by to say hi to Sherlock.  Of course, 221B didn't exist on the road until a few years ago.

We did a quick drive by to say hi to Sherlock. Of course, 221B didn’t exist on the road until a few years ago.

And of course, they made a museum out of it.

And of course, they made a museum out of it.

The many unicorns of London.  This one happens to be where the Queen lives.

The many unicorns of London. This one happens to be where the Queen lives.

A better view of the gates to the Queen's home and where the changing of the guards takes place.  We missed it by about thirty seconds!

A better view of the gates to the Queen’s home and where the changing of the guards takes place. We missed it by about thirty seconds!

Westminster Abbey - where Prince William got married.

Westminster Abbey – where Prince William got married.

Big Ben is the bell.  The tower is now named after Queen Elizabeth.

Big Ben is the bell. The tower is now named after Queen Elizabeth.

The Brits liked Lincoln a whole lot.

The Brits liked Lincoln a whole lot.

And of course they had Churchill.

And of course they had Churchill.

I liked how Horatio Nelson had a VERY tall statue.

I liked how Horatio Nelson had a VERY tall statue.

On this particular day, there happened to be a big blue chicken that also inhabited the square where Nelson is situated.

On this particular day, there happened to be a big blue chicken that also inhabited the square where Nelson is situated.

I had to take a picture of a telephone booth.  They're so rare now!

I had to take a picture of a telephone booth. They’re so rare now!

Luckily we drove by this store twice, but it's the best photo I could get - Dirty Rotten Scoundrels suits! Cool, right?!?

Luckily we drove by this store twice, but it’s the best photo I could get – Dirty Rotten Scoundrels suits! Cool, right?!?

Like unicorns, dragons were everywhere protecting the city.

Like unicorns, dragons were everywhere protecting the city.

And the crest was also posted all over.

And the crest was also posted all over.

I learned that it takes a lot to get a license to be a taxi driver in London.  This guy is still learning all of the ways to get around town the quickest possible.  He'll then have to eventually take a test!

I learned that it takes a lot to get a license to be a taxi driver in London. This guy is still learning all of the ways to get around town the quickest possible. He’ll then have to eventually take a test!

This is a monument where the Great Fire of London started.

This is a monument where the Great Fire of London started.

Here's a pub that needed the help of a comma.  Otherwise, I'm not sure what a "hung drawn" is.

Here’s a pub that needed the help of a comma. Otherwise, I’m not sure what a “hung drawn” is.

This is what it looks like when the big red trolley busses collide.

This is what it looks like when the big red trolley busses collide.

This building was built so it would stand out and be majestic.

This building was built so it would stand out and be majestic.

David said it was called The Gherkin by a lot of people.  My friend Troy said it looked like a bullet.  I think it looks like a Faberge egg.

David said it was called The Gherkin by a lot of people. My friend Troy said it looked like a bullet. I think it looks like a Faberge egg.

Here's a piece of the tower bridge that leads us to the Tower of London.

Here’s a piece of the tower bridge that leads us to the Tower of London.

There used to be animals at the Tower of London.  So they made replicas.

There used to be animals at the Tower of London. So they made replicas.

Here's a fuller view of the Tower of London.

Here’s a fuller view of the Tower of London.

This was a footbridge built to commemorate the millennium, so they called it the Millennium Bridge.  But most Londoners call it the Wobbly Bridge because if everyone walks in unison (like during a parade) the bridge will start to gyrate and wobble back and forth!

This was a footbridge built to commemorate the millennium, so they called it the Millennium Bridge. But most Londoners call it the Wobbly Bridge because if everyone walks in unison (like during a parade) the bridge will start to gyrate and wobble back and forth!

Sam Wanamaker, the director, wanted to recreate where Shakespeare performed, so he did.  This is it.  They still do plays here.

Sam Wanamaker, the director, wanted to recreate where Shakespeare performed, so he did. This is it. They still do plays here.

I loved that they put this on the side of the wall.  Very cool.

I loved that they put this on the side of the wall. Very cool.

So seeing all of this all day and being in the car made us feel sleepy and cooped up, so David dropped us off at the theatre and instructed us where to take a walk, grab a drink, and meet him for our final trek to the other airport.

We found this really cool market that reminds me of a very very large East End Market.

We found this really cool market that reminds me of a very very large East End Market.

This weather vane reminds me of Peter Pan and Hook's ship.

This weather vane reminds me of Peter Pan and Hook’s ship.

So that’s all of the pictures I care to share.  Yes, we saw the Eye, yes we saw Parliament, and no, we didn’t go to where the Beatles walk on Abbey Road – that was more out of the way than Sherlock’s abode.  Would I like to go back and enjoy it at a much slower pace? Sure! Am I glad I did what I did? You betcha.  Beats hanging out at an airport for 10 hours.


#TravelEffect

Gary Oster, with the U.S. Travel Association spoke at Visit Orlando’s National Travel & Tourism Luncheon.  I’ve written about what the USTA, Brand USA, and Discover America have been up to for the past couple of years (posts here and here), and now, the USTA is focusing on promoting travel from within the country, instead of just selling the US to the world.  Their idea is that if they can get the 42% of people who typically don’t use all of their vacation days on a vacation, they could get back the estimated $67 billion dollars left on the table for travel spending.  They’ve calculated that if each of these people took just one more day of travel, that would be $30 billion added in travel spending.

Some of their validation points for convincing everyone to take their vacation days and travel are:

-Divorce rates are higher among couples that don’t travel.

-Men that don’t take an annual vacation increase their chance of heart problems by 30%.

-And, the biggie, if you don’t take your vacation days, you’re volunteering a pay cut to your company.  So take them all!

Well, I’m sold. :)

Both general product and travel industry marketers and advertisers  are jumping on the bandwagon to get people into the traveling mood.  Others just use it as an emotional technique to motivate others to buy a product to enjoy that kind of lifestyle.  Some examples:

 


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