Buddying Up to Bungalower

Bungalower celebrated their one year anniversary a few weeks ago.  My Bestie and I went to the party at the Hammered Lamb, enjoyed a member cocktail, and partook in a train shot.

2014-08-14 18.46.56 HDR

A member cocktail you say? How do you become a member and what is it for?  Well, to be a member of the Bungalower, you pay the low low price of $9.95 per month and it gets you at least $30 in coupons of freebies and discounts around the bungalow communities (i.e. College Park, Thornton Park, Audubon Park, etc).

So in honor of being treated so well as a member, I thought I would showcase a night I had on the town, all thanks to the Bungalower!

First stop was the Artisan's Table.  I had a different version of a Pisco Sour (discovered these in Cusco, Peru) called the Black Beauty.

First stop was the Artisan’s Table. I had a different version of a Pisco Sour (discovered these in Cusco, Peru) called the Black Beauty.

 

2014-08-15 22.02.17

Then we stopped for the best popsicles on the planet at the Pop Parlour (formerly the Hyppo – no one new what that was). And from the coupon you can see that they do have alcoholic popsicles. They are also quite tasty.

 

Finally, we ended the night at Aku Aku.  Unfortunately, their free drink did not mean their signature cocktails, so my Bestie used the coupon to buy a beer and I split a Fu Man Chu (ginger and rum) with my Partner In Crime.

Finally, we ended the night at Aku Aku. Unfortunately, their free drink did not mean their signature cocktails, so my Bestie used the coupon to buy a beer and I split a Fu Manchu (ginger and rum… and mint, if you couldn’t tell by the picture) with my Partner In Crime.

After that, we took a Lyft home (see my blog post here to learn how to earn a free ride with them).

The next morning, we used another coupon from Bungalower to replenish our electrolytes with a tasty juice from Grounding Roots.  For a small up charge, we were able to get the 16 oz bottle, rather than their tasting size.

2014-08-16 10.08.50

 

 

So if you’re looking for a way to get involved in the community and learn about new businesses opening (and unfortunately others closing) check out Bungalower.  And if you’re like me and like perks, become a member today!


Why I’m Trying to Harness A Whole New Mind

About a year ago, Simon T. Bailey recommended that his followers read A Whole New Mind: Why Right-Brainers Will Rule the Future, by Daniel H. Pink.  Since I have a queue, I just finished reading it.  I enjoyed Mr. Pink’s insights on how our education system as created so many Left-Brain thinkers (myself included) and how these people need to learn to adapt in order to stay relevant in their career.  He talks about how modernization and assembly-lines have created efficient thinkers and products, but that now the only way employers and consumers will work with and purchase these seemingly undifferentiated people and products is to have those people and products think more creatively and be creatively designed.  A great product example of this is toilet brushes.  You can go anywhere and buy a simple toilet brush.  They are all pretty much the same – EXCEPT for the toilet brush designed by Michael Graves for Target.  That thing is a work of art and people are willing to pay more for something unique and interesting.

This book falls in line with the same theme as Linchpin in that workers need to make themselves invaluable.  Like Linchpin, this books gives tips, but it also gives so much more.  He lists out things you should do to work your Right-Brain muscle and makes you look at the world differently.  The exercises definitely make you appreciate the robust creativeness the world has to offer; we just have to learn how to tap into it.

There was one section that I thought was thought-provoking enough to hit the bookmark button while I was listening to it.  It was a section about how to create “symphony” in your own work and life.  The Left-Brain has been so used to processing systematic pieces parts and the Left-Brain has begun to atrophy on being able to register the whole forest.   He provides a list of other books to help to get your “symphony” back.  They are:

Beethoven’s Anvil: Music in Mind and Culture by William Benzon

Dialogue: The Art of Thinking Together by William Isaacs

Metaphors We Live By by George Lakoff and Mark Johnson

How to See: A Guide to Reading Our Man-Made Environment by George Nelson

What books do you think just made it to my To Be Read List?  If you’re curious about what else I’ve read or am going to read, check out my Pinterest Board where I keep my list here.  I also just joined “GoodReads” and you can be my friend if you sign up and click here.

Also, because I’ve been trying to write a little bit about each book I read and LinkedIn stopped housing book reviews, I made a new page on my website.  Look up at the top of the screen and you’ll see Book Reviews.  Let me know what you think about any of them if you’ve read them, too!


My Adventures with Lyft

If you live in a bigger city or in Orlando, you’ve probably heard of Lyft by now.  Or at least Uber.  For those of you who haven’t, just know it’s kind of like a ride-share app that connects people who want to drive people around with people who want to be driven around, and kind of like a taxi.  (But shhhh, taxi is a four-letter word in this community.)

They just entered the Orlando market and offered everyone who signed up in the first week with them being here 50 free $25 rides to be used within two weeks.  Uber had done the same, and while I signed up with them, for some reason I never used their service.  And then when Lyft came in I figured I just had to give it a try to see what the fuss was about.

I’m hooked.  (Finish reading this blog post and you could be, too.)

I started using it last Tuesday because I needed to go downtown to a meeting and parking in the middle of the day there is annoying.  And then I used it that evening when I had another meeting downtown.  And then after the meeting I took another one to dinner!  And then on Friday, my family and I took it to dinner, then to drinks, and then to dancing.  And then on Saturday, we went to a charity event down by the mouse and took it.  And, since it was a longer drive, the cost was well over the $25 in which we had to pay the difference.  So instead of heading straight home after the event, we stopped mid-stream and used the savings to buy ourselves a glass of wine.  :)

But aren’t you worried about the kinds of people picking you up???  I have met some really, really nice people who are driving for Lyft.  Everyone kind of has to be because they’re rated as drivers and then the drivers also rate the passengers! (I have 5 out of 5 stars still, by the way.)  So no one can be mean or they get dinged.  Everyone is using it as a second job because their firsts either are sporadic because of the industry they’re in, or are just looking for more extra income.  One guy has a pretty decent full time salaried job, but has a baby on the way, so he’s going to be doing BOTH Uber and Lyft until December 25th (the due date… and Christmas.)

When a person wants to be a part of Lyft, they apply online and are then given a choice of Mentors to meet up with to have the driving interview, paperwork filled out for the background check, pictures of them and their car taken for the app, and the car inspected.  A difference between Uber and Lyft is that for Uber all of the background and interview is done all online, and then Uber sends the driver a phone to use and they’re good to go.  Lyft drivers use their own phones.  And Lyft cars are allowed to be as old as a 2000 (hence the inspection) and Uber requires a 2006 or younger.  I’ve ridden in a 2013 Prius, a Mercedes SUV, and another nice looking SUV that I can’t recall the make or model of, but it was nice – it had two moon roofs.  All owned by the drivers.

I’ve heard that they’re not covered by insurance policies and you take it at your own risk.  Is that true?  Nope.  Not true at all.  Lyft touts on their website  that they cover each driver while they’re on shift and covers the passenger with a million dollar policy.  I asked one of the Uber/Lyft combo drivers about Uber and he showed me the insurance policy he accessed from the app.  It also covers up to a million dollars but only while a passenger is in the car.  So, it’s actually safer to catch a lift with an Uber or Lyft driver than have one of your friends with a questionable amount of insurance drive you around for a night on the town.

The inside scoop.

On the last ride for the night on Friday, we had a very well-informed driver.  He is actually a manager who helped open the Orlando market and has to take as many passengers as possible to help train the passengers on how to use the service.  He told me the ins and outs of how Lyft always comes in a month after Uber and then Side Car always comes a month after that.  We discussed the differences and similarities between all of the services and how they market themselves differently.  It’s an exciting time in the transportation business.  I had first thought I wanted my blog post to be about the controversy between the big taxi dawg in town (they who will not be named) but I decided to keep this topic light, fresh, and fun, which is really the essence of what Lyft is.  If you are interested in trying Lyft out, download the app to your phone from your app store.  But before you take your first ride, go to the payment section of the app and plug in patti301 (that’s a zero) into the “credit code” box.  You’ll get a free ride up to $25, and once you redeem it, I will too!

Me playing in the back seat of the Lyft car with the iconic Lyft mustache.

Me playing in the back seat of the Lyft car with the iconic Lyft mustache.


Ads and Rishikesh

Ah Rishikesh.  The Land of the Saints.  How I miss you.  I will be back.  But until then, I’ll look at my pictures.

view of Rishikesh view of Rishikesh 2

Post at Your Own Risk

Power polls were the choice vehicle on which to post signs for various businesses and services.

DSC01259

I’m totally going to stay at the Hotel Nirvana Palace. We became friends with the owner and his family and they rock.

DSC01249

We ate at Vedangas during our cleanse. All we could have was soup. It was the best tasting soup ever. And then we ate the day after the cleanse was over. And we ate too much. And I ate yak cheese lasagna. And it was amazing. And I paid for it later. Soni essentially saved my life from that experience.

DSC01248 DSC01250 DSC01266

Or trees.

DSC01260 DSC01267

 

Or just the wall.

event based 2 branding 14

 

Enter at Your Own Risk

One of the coolest experiences we had (besides white water rafting in Mother Ganga – that was cool AND cold) was getting to go into the abandoned ashram where the Beatles stayed when they were in Rishikesh.

This is the entrance to the ashram.  Like I said, it's abandoned, but for a small fee you can get in with the guy who has the key to the lock on the gate.  It's his lock, by the way.

This is the entrance to the ashram. Like I said, it’s abandoned, but for a small fee you can get in with the guy who has the key to the lock on the gate. It’s his lock, by the way.

This is what is known as the Beatles Cathedral.  Some fans who wanted to pay homage to the group broke into the abandoned ashram and began painting all over the walls of the gathering hall.  They eventually got kick out for being there too long, but the paintings remain.  It was super cool.

This is what is known as the Beatles Cathedral. Some fans who wanted to pay homage to the group broke into the abandoned ashram and began painting all over the walls of the gathering hall. They eventually got kicked out for being there too long, but the paintings remain. It was super cool.

 

Namaste.


Linchpin Thoughts and a Colleague’s Tips on Climbing the Career Ladder

I now have another book to offer young people out of college and just stepping into their first jobs of their career: Linchpin, by Seth Godin.  If you recall in one of my post from the #BizWomen Orlando Business Journal Women Mentorship Program, Shirley Decker, with I.D.E.A.S. recommended I read this book.

Because I’ve now been in working my career for more than 10 years now (AACK, OMG, IT’S BEEN THAT LONG?!? I JUST BLEW MY OWN MIND HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO ME), the book was more of a pat on the back for the fact that I followed the book to a T before it was written.  And so that’s why I want to recommend it to new people.  I think it will really help the Millenials coming into the workforce understand that, while “paying your dues” is something they don’t have to tolerate (because they are demanding a more work-life balance than those of us that came right before them), they do need to make themselves indispensable if  they don’t want to work their butts off.  The book outlines many ways people have made their mark and gives tips on how one can showcase their creativity, problem-solving skills, and expertise in their field.  There were great life lessons that if one can learn them vicariously from the author of this book, they’ll be able to to make easier leaps to better positions – or they’ll be helping create their own positions in life (kind of like I did… I love my job, by the way.)

A colleague whom I wish I could call mentor but frankly I’ve never gotten to spend enough time with him (although I did try back in 2009 or so) has written an article on his agency’s blog on this same topic as well as created a video discussing the same content.  That swell person is Terry Mooney, the COO of Evok, one of the larger ad agencies in the Orlando Area.  They have a newsletter they post, which you can sign up for here, and his video, posted below with his permission, is another great asset that young people should watch and absorb. (Actually, click on the youtube button because they keep adding videos and I haven’t figured out how to get it to start on Terry’s… but he’s easy to find in the playlist.)

 

 


Ads on the Road to Rishikesh

From Delhi we traveled four hours to Rishikesh, and along the way, we saw interesting transportation and interesting ads.  :)

On some of the roads, we'd have to pull over for the driver to go to a building and pay for the toll.

On some of the roads, we’d have to pull over for the driver to go to a building and pay for the toll.  The first time we though he’d abandoned us, but luckily our lovely guide was their to explain the procedure.

Here are some pictures of the kinds of transportation we came across while driving the highways and inside of the small towns:

A colorful bus and a horse drawn trailer full of sticks.  There was no way to pass them for awhile.  And people tried.

A colorful bus and a horse drawn trailer full of sticks (and there were a lot of each that morning). There was no way to pass them for awhile. And people tried.

Motorized bicycles and scooters dashed in ad out of traffic.

Motorized bicycles, regular bicycles and scooters dashed in and out of traffic.

People road in the back of trucks all of the time.  And almost every over-sized vehicle asked everyone to honk their horns before, during, and after they were passed.

People rode in the back of trucks all of the time. And almost every over-sized vehicle asked everyone to honk their horns before, during, and after they were passed.  It was a very honky country.  At first it would annoy me because of how we in the US have been trained to handle honks: one must be doing something wrong, right?  Well, in India, honking was the way for everyone to know where everyone was as mirrors were irregular, cars were different sizes, and no one actually drove in the lanes painted on the roads.

This is a tractor.  It was on the major highway leading out of Dehli.  It was kind of slow.

This is a tractor. It was on the major highway leading out of Dehli. It was slow.

Horses were still a major source of transportation among the small towns.

Horses were still a major source of transportation among the small towns.

As we were taking pictures of all of the billboards we started to wonder how people could get their ads on them.  We finally found out mid-way of the trek.

Advertise here

Most women in India never showed their shoulders.  But I guess it was okay for advertising?

Most women in India never showed their shoulders. But I guess it was okay for advertising?

Speaking of not covering up, this public school had a naked guru on it.  They're allowed to be naked though.

Speaking of not covering up, this public school had a naked guru on it. They’re allowed to be naked though.

This public school had a giraffe.  I'm not sure why.

This public school had a giraffe. I’m not sure why.

More naked-ish guys.  They work out.

More naked-ish guys. They work out.

There were so many great ads about the problems with drinking and driving on the highways.  This was one of the better shots we could get.  The image is thinly drawn, which is never a best practice when designing a billboard.

There were so many great ads about the problems with drinking and driving on the highways. This was one of the better shots we could get. The image is thinly drawn, which is never a best practice when designing a billboard.

Old buildings were covered in advertising, like I've seen in Peru and Puerto Rico.  Hopefully this helped whoever owned the building.

Old buildings were covered in advertising, like I’ve seen in Peru and Puerto Rico. Hopefully this helped whoever owned the building.

There was so much construction happening in Northeast India that B2B advertising was prevalent.

There was so much construction happening in Northeast India that B2B advertising was prevalent.

Naked billboard.

Naked billboard.


Advertising to the LGBT Community

This blog post was inspired by the new Allstate commercial that spread across Facebook like a wildfire.  In case you were buried under a rock (or are my Mom and this is how she learns about these things… Hi Mom):

It’s inclusive, subtle, thoughtful, endearing, insightful, caring, and clear.  It made me start to think about other amazing ads that either include or target the LGBT community so I did a Google search and it took me on a very satisfying path of learning how the marketing community has evolved in incorporating the LGBT community into all of our community.

The Human Rights Campaign (HRC) put out a list of the top LGBT ads in 2013 and posted a Best Practices to LGBT Marketing and Advertising that ad agencies are starting to follow.  Some of the ads showcased just had all kinds of people in them, like the Nordstrom ad below, or explicitly showcased gay couples doing ordinary things.

Adweek posted their own Best Gay Ads of ever and there was a segment of the list dedicated to ads that were considered inclusive.  They introduced the segment very poignantly, so I’m going to quote them: “Finally, we get to the holy grail of advertising for those who’ve sought gay equality: inclusive, respectful (and usually quite boring) ads that treat gay people like anyone else. I suppose it shouldn’t be surprising that these are often the most controversial.”

Bustle.com also had The Best Ads with Gay Couples and at the very bottom it mentioned that Barneys New York had decided to do an all transgender model campaign for Spring of 2014.  Intrigued, I looked it up and there was a very lovely 30 minute movie about the shoot and the individuals and their stories.  It was very moving and you should take the time to watch it.  The first couple of minutes is fairly artsy, but get through that and learn a little more about a side of humanity you may have not thought much about.  I can’t have it play on my site, so just click the square box and go to Vimeo and enjoy.

Brothers, Sisters, Sons & Daughters: The Film from Barneys The Window on Vimeo.

 


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 363 other followers